Whalefest Monterey 2019

Event Date:
Jan 26 - Jan 27, 2019 at 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Location:
Monterey's Old Fisherman's Wharf
1 Old Fisherman's Wharf
Monterey, CA

Save the date for the 9th Annual Whalefest Monterey on Saturday and Sunday, January 26 and 27, 2019. More details coming soon!

 

Save the Date! Monterey Old Fisherman's Wharf Association presents the 9th Annual Whalefest Monterey to be held at and around Old Fisherman’s Wharf, Monterey, California, The Whale Watching Capital of the World™ on Saturday, January 26th and Sunday, January 27th, 2019 from 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM. This free, fun and educational interactive family event for all ages celebrates the migration of the gray whales and much more!
 
Take a look at our Whalefest Monterey 2018 details!

8th Annual Whalefest Monterey to be held on January 27 & 28, 2018 at Old Fisherman’s Wharf, Monterey, California including an outstanding 2-day Symposium at the Wharf Theatre

The Whale Watching Capital of the World™

January 15, 2018. Monterey, CA.  Don’t miss a free fun and educational, interactive family event for all ages that celebrates the migration of the gray whales and much more! The event also benefits many local and national marine organizations that educate, inspire, and empower the public to protect the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

At a Glance:

What: The Monterey Old Fisherman's Wharf Association will sponsor and hold the 8th Annual Whalefest Monterey

Where: At and around Old Fisherman’s Wharf, Monterey, California, The Whale Watching Capital of the World™ . Directions: https://www.montereywharf.com/map.html

When: Saturday, January 27 and Sunday, January 28, 2018 from 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM. 

The schedule for the weekend event and the 2-day Symposium is now posted on https://www.montereywharf.com/event/whalefest-monterey.html

There is 4-hour free parking, courtesy of the City of Monterey, for locals with Monterey County ID from January 26-28, 2018. 

Information: [email protected] or (831) 238-0777.

About Whalefest Monterey:

Whalefest Monterey™ celebrates the migration of the gray whales, and benefits the many local and national marine organizations that build awareness about the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary which educate, inspire, and empower the public to protect it.

Among the highlights will be an outstanding Symposium with lectures and documentaries related to ocean and marine life conservation presented at the Wharf Theatre. Check https://www.montereywharf.com/event/whalefest-monterey.html for details. 

Besides musical performances, there will be many educational displays by organizations that affect the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Thousands of attendees are expected again this year that range from local families and school children who want to learn more about our maritime environment to visitors from near and far who want to explore the annual whale migration.

Whale watchers come from around the world to view hundreds of whales, orcas, dolphins and pelicans who continue to feast on a “krill and anchovy buffet” in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Throughout the year, this Whale Watching Capital of the World offers sightings of 15 species of whales, 10 species of dolphins, 2 species of porpoise, 6 species of pinnipeds and 1 species of Fissiped (sea otter).

Weather permitting, whale watching tours, fishing, sailing and glass bottom boats will be operating from the Wharf (for a fee), and Wharf restaurants will be serving lunch and dinner. Wharf shops will also be featuring marine-themed merchandise.

The two-day event will feature a wide array of fun and informative activities including:

•             Dee: The Beautiful Inflatable 43-foot Whale will be back at Whalefest. Attendees are able to go inside and see the ribs, heart, lungs, baleen, stomach and esophagus.

•             A 13-foot whale from MAOS will also be on display.

•             Gyutaku, the Japanese art of stenciling fish, will be a fun activity for kids from Noon to 4:00 pm both days outside of Discovery Whale Watching from 12-4 both days.

•             Scrimshaw, the antique art of carving created by Basque and Portuguese whalers will take place outside of Monterey Bay Whale Watching from 12 - 4 both days.

•             The popular animatronic Coastie the Safety Boat™, a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, Flotilla 64 Monterey, will roam and talk with attendees.

•             Fire Boat and US Coast Guard 47' Surf Boat will be at the Fisherman's Wharf California Dock near the Big Fish Grill. The US Coast Guard 29' Fast Response Boat will be on the Causeway.

•             Seafloor Science ROV Summer Day Camp (for ages 8-10 and 11-14) will have underwater Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) for visitors of all ages to "drive" in an enclosed tank! Stop by the SS-ROV Day Camp tent to say hello, have some fun, and discover a bit about the nuts and bolts of ocean exploration!

•             Marine Life Studies Take it to the Streets™ is partnering with Surfrider for the Whalefest Community Beach & Bike Path Cleanup. Meet 11:00 am on Sunday, January 28, 2018 at the Marine Life Studies Booth.  

•             Chef Tene Shake of the American Culinary Federation will do a seafood cooking demonstration on Saturday at 2:00 pm and Sunday at 1:00 pm in front of Old Fisherman's Grotto.

•             Abalone Races sponsored by Monterey Abalone Company. Watch multi-footed mollusks race marathons on Saturday at 1:00 pm and 1:30 pm and Sunday at 12:00 pm and 12:30 pm outside of Big Fish Grill.

There will also be many colorful photo ops with costumed animals roaming the Wharf area including a whale, leatherback turtle, mola-mola, shark and the Bag Monster.

The event will feature many other interactive “edutaining” displays and activities on both days from American Cetacean Society, California Coastal Commission, Camp SEA Lab, Coast Guard Auxiliary,  Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reservation, Friends of the Monterey Public Library, Heirs to Our Oceans, Hess Design, Marine Life Studies, Marine Mammal Center, Monterey Academy Oceanographic Science (MAOS), Monterey Fire Department's Fire Boat, Monterey Peninsula Yacht Club, Mt. Madonna School, Otter Project, Pacific Grove Museum, Save the Whales, Seafloor Science ROV. Sea Otter Savvy, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, Student Oceanography Club, Sustainable Monterey, United State Coast Guard, with additional organizations to be confirmed soon.

The 2-Day Symposium line up is also listed on https://www.montereywharf.com/event/two-day-symposium-at-8th-annual-whalefest-monterey.html

Whalefest commemorative t-shirts will be available for a donation of $10 and whale and dolphin print aprons will be available for a $18 donation or both for a $25 donation. This year, the donations will benefit the non-profit, CASA, which helps the underserved children of Monterey County.

Live Musical Entertainment

The event will feature an array of great live music bpth days including Nick Fettis and his “Orca”stra, Richard Carr (Creator/performer of piano/keyboard soundtracks for the soul, mind & body), Mark Richardson (“Mountain Dulcimer of an Eclectic Kind”), Bill Minor (keyboards) & Richard Rosen (harmonica), Kuumbwa Jazz Honor Band, Monterey High School Jazz Band and Jonah and the Whale Watchers.

Event Sponsors

The event’s sponsors include Monterey State Historic Park, Marine Life Studies, MAOS, Monterey Signs, Fashion Streaks, Santa Cruz Waves, Pepsi, U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Catalina Photography and the Wecker Group. Media sponsors include KAZU Radio, Monterey Herald and KSBW TV, Central Coast ABC, Estrella TV.

Check out video excerpts from prior years of outstanding Whalefest Monterey Symposium Presentations:

6th Annual Monterey Whalefest (2016) 

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJFlU5j65V2FipOks9r6TbFp00JDLjdS_

 7th Annual Monterey Whalefest (2017)

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QJ0cVmPtK0&list=PLJFlU5j65V2H4fdLimcb_hklyBvbF9VxU

 For more updates, go to www.montereywharf.com or call (831) 238-0777.

The event, which features a 2-day Symposium with world-renowned marine experts and dozens of exhibit booths, benefits many local and national marine organizations that educate, inspire, and empower the public to protect the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.
 
Marine-themed exhibitors are now being sought for the upcoming 9th Annual Whalefest Monterey™. Any agency, institution, business, or organization who has a marine-themed interactive, educational display or activity can apply to participate in this very special event, including students of all ages. Please note that no merchandise sales are allowed although fundraising is permitted at an approved non-profit booth.
 
To receive an application to participate in the 9th Annual Whalefest Monterey or for more information, please email Antoinette Saylor at [email protected]
 
About Whalefest Monterey
 
Each year, Whalefest Monterey celebrates the migration of the gray whales, and benefits the many local and national marine organizations that build awareness about the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary which educate, inspire, and empower the public to protect it.
 
Among the highlights is a 2-Day Symposium with lectures and documentaries by world-renowned experts related to ocean and marine life conservation, musical performances, and many educational displays by participating organizations. Thousands of attendees are expected again this year that range from local families and school children who want to learn more about our maritime environment to visitors from near and far who want to explore the annual whale migration.
 
Whale watchers come from around the world to view hundreds of whales, orcas, dolphins and pelicans who continue to feast on a “krill and anchovy buffet” in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. Throughout the year, this Whale Watching Capital of the World offers sightings of 15 species of whales, 10 species of dolphins, 2 species of porpoise, 6 species of pinnipeds and 1 species of Fissiped (sea otter).
 
Weather permitting, whale watching tours, fishing, sailing and glass bottom boats will be operating from the Wharf many at discounted rates), and Wharf restaurants will be serving lunch and dinner. Wharf shops will also be featuring marine-themed merchandise.
 
For more information, go to www.montereywharf.com.

 

2018 Symposium Schedule 

 

Saturday, January 27, 2018

 

10:00 Intro, Steve Ellzey, KION, M.C.

 

10:05 - 11:30 Elan Portner, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University " Exploring Open Ocean Food Webs: What can an Undesirable Fish Tell us About Whale Food?”

 

The open ocean contains over 95% of habitable space on Earth! This vast habitat may look almost uniform at the surface, but contains layers of very different habitats stacked between the surface and the ocean floor. Animals that live in these diverse habitats must strike a delicate balance between finding food and becoming food, and have amazing strategies for hiding in the open ocean. This interactive presentation will provide an introduction to the hidden biology of the open ocean, helping land-lubbers to imagine life in the cold, dark depths of the ocean.

 

Specifically, we will focus on animals that marine predators (e.g. tunas, sharks, and whales) like to eat, which are small, but good swimmers, making them difficult to study. Our unlikely assistant will be a common marine predator, the longnose lancetfish, commonly captured as bycatch in many open ocean fisheries. By dissecting the stomach of a few lancetfish, we can get up close and personal with some poorly known open ocean animals and learn how marine predators share a common food source.

 

Elan Portner is a PhD candidate at Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove. His research is focused on improving our understanding of open ocean food webs through the development and implementation of cost effective sampling technologies.

 

11:40 - 12:00 Paul Michel, Superintendent of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, "An update on the latest developments concerning the Sanctuary"

 

Paul Michel addresses the latest issues and activities at the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

 

Paul  Michel is a nationally-recognized leader in wetlands, coast, and ocean management and protection. As Superintendent of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, he is responsible for all of the science, education, and resource protection programs involved with managing and protecting the nation’s second largest marine sanctuary at over 6,000 square miles. 

 

12:15 - 1:00 Adam Ratner,  Marine Mammal Center," Saving Species in the Monterey Bay"

Despite the many protections offered by the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, marine mammals have been stranding in record numbers over the past few years. The Marine Mammal Center is making critical scientific advancements to better understand the threats marine mammals face. Adam Ratner will share more about the Center’s cutting-edge research on Guadalupe fur seals and southern sea otters along the Central California coast, as well as how the Center’s research on domoic acid is not only helping marine mammals, but keeping people safe as well.

Adam Ratner is a marine scientist and educator with The Marine Mammal Center, the world’s largest marine mammal hospital and educational center. Overseeing visitor operations, he challenges guests to think differently about ocean conservation using the stories of individual patients that are rescued by the Center. He incorporates topics including climate change, ocean trash, and sustainable seafood into the Center’s guest experience, in some cases exposing visitors for the first time to the simple idea that their actions have an impact on the ocean.

 

1:00 - 2:00 LUNCH BREAK Short ocean related video documentaries will be shown

 

2:00 - 2:45 Greg Cailliet, Moss Landing Marine Lab, "Below Pacific Tides - Fishes that live in Subtidal Habitats in Monterey Bay"

 

Greg Cailliet will summarize the marine habitats in Monterey Bay and the typical assemblages of fishes, and some invertebrates, which occupy them with a focus on the deep water column that is below most whales that occur here.

 

Greg Cailliet is Professor Emeritus of Biology (Ichthyology) Moss Landing Marine Laboratories & California State University, Fresno; Director Emeritus, Pacific Shark Research Center, and

Associate Director, Friends of Moss Landing Marine Lab. He was a founding member of the Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve (ESNERR) Advisory Committee and was the founding Chair of the Research Activity Panel (RAP) for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary and served on the Sanctuary Advisory Committee (SAC).
 

For more than four decades, his graduate students have studied the ecology of marine fishes. He has specifically been primarily interested in deep-sea fishes and their ecology but also bay, estuarine bony and cartilaginous fishes. He and his graduate students have pioneered age determination, verification, and validation techniques of fishes using the growth zones in their calcified structures, along with their radio-isotopic characteristics.

 

3:00 - 4:00 Peggy Stap, Founding Director of Marine Life Studies and the Whale Entanglement Team (WET)®  ”Saving Whales From Life-threatening Entanglements - The Whale Entanglement Team (WET)®

 

Entanglement in fishing gear and marine debris is becoming one of the greatest threats posed to whales worldwide. The number of entangled whales reported in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary and statewide has increased significantly. WET® was founded by Peggy Stap along with Mary Whitney, Founding Director of Fluke Foundation. Learn how this highly trained team uses specialized equipment to rescue whales from a slow, painful death due to life-threatening entanglements as Stap chronicles some recent rescues. The work is conducted under the authority of the Endangered Species Act/Marine Mammal Protection Act permit issued to the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program. WET® was featured on the PBS/BBC Big Blue Live, August 2015.  

 

 4:15 - 5:00 Anne Warner, Think Beyond Plastic, "Reducing Marine Plastic Pollution Through Innovation and Entrepreneurship and Leveraging the Social Enterprise: Lessons Learned from the Mesoamerican Reef Project"

 

Anne Warner will discuss Think Beyond Plastic‘s pilot project on the Bay Islands of Honduras which offers a new approach to plastic pollution and its impact on ecosystems that embraces design thinking and focuses on building the economic engine to support systemic, and permanent reduction of marine and land-based plastic pollution. It involves investments in forward-looking innovations, including new materials, new manufacturing processes, new recycling processes, and new design.


The long-term vision for the project is a global model for eliminating ocean plastic pollution by developing the underlying economic engine supporting the shift away from conventional plastics to alternatives.


Anne Warner has a strong background in sciences and a passion for marine conservation. Her research  on a remote coral reef island started  a career mitigating anthropogenic effects on the oceans and marine organisms. She spent  six months on the Midway Atoll, one of the most isolated coral reefs in the world, to develop a comprehensive management plan to manage impacts of climate change. As a research team leader, she designed and led  projects related to geological processes and groundwater/nutrient composition. She also  assisted with coral recruitment and bleaching, algal bloom, and invertebrate distribution projects.

 

Sunday, January 28, 2018

 

10:00 Intro, Steve Ellzey, M.C.

 

10:05 - 10:50 Heirs To Our Oceans:  "World Changers, Empowerment Learning"

 

Members  of Heirs To Our Ocean, a group of youth leaders , will describe the organization and their efforts with a focus on  whales and climate change, whales and plastics, and whales and entanglement.  

 

Heirs To Our Oceans are dedicated to inspire awareness, responsibility and action amongst youth worldwide to protect the waters of our Blue Planet for future generations.  They empower youth, supporting them in their education and engagement in tackling human impact on our planet.  They are active in the world making change and protecting our oceans through beach clean ups, speaking engagements, political action and more.  They work to encourage parents, educators and policy makers to teach youth starting in middle school about real-world problems so that they may develop essential problem-solving skills to prepare them for the world they will inherit.  

 

11:00 - 11:45 Benyamin Rosental, Stanford University & Hopkins Marine Station, "A Unique Marine Model for Stem Cell Transplantation"

 

Benyamin Rosental  will give a talk from his personal research point of view and how a unique marine organism can give us answers to medical questions.

 

Coming from Ben Gurion University in Israel, Benyamin Rosental is currently with the Stem Cell Institute, Immunology Department, School of Medicine at Stanford University and Hopkins Marine Station. His PhD research was in cancer and viral immunology. As a postdoctoral research fellow at Stanford, he is currently studying stem cell transplantation at the laboratory of Prof. Irving Weissman.

 

11:45 - 1:00 LUNCH BREAK  Short ocean related video documentaries will be shown

 

1:00 - 2:00 John Ryan, MBARI & John Joseph, NPS. "The Ocean Soundscape is a Whalefest"

 

Get ready for an incredible sound experience! Listen to whales communicate under water over great distances. This talk will provide a high-level view of the insights offered by being a good listener to the sea where

whales and other marine mammals produce and use sound for essential life activities  and how noise that we introduce into the marine environment can interfere with their lives.

 

 In collaboration with Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) and academic institutions along the California coast, the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) embarked on an ocean-listening journey, deploying a hydrophone (underwater microphone) on a cabled observatory.  This observatory connects the world of ocean sound to shore, streaming recordings to MBARI in real-time, around the clock.  Analysis of these recordings is revealing how the magnificent migratory giants of the sea utilize the biologically rich habitat of MBNMS, how their presence relates to variations in the marine environment, and what human noise sources enter the regional marine soundscape.

 

John Ryan is a biological oceanographer at Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), where he has studied the ecology of Monterey Bay and the California Current System for  two decades.

 

 A former US Navy officer, John Joseph is a Research Associate in the Ocean Acoustics Laboratory at NPS where he currently conducts research with a focus on acoustic modeling, characterizing undersea noise, passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammals and investigations into behavioral responses of marine mammals to anthropogenic sound including naval sonar.

 

2:15 - 3:00 Alison Haupt, CSUMB, "Integrating Marine Research into the Classroom: Persistence of Black Abalone in Monterey Revisited"

 

Black abalone has been protected from all fishing in central California since 1993. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s  Abalone Recovery and Management Plan (ARMP)  identified initial criteria for abalone recovery, while another study found that marine reserves had more larger abalone. A class at CSU Monterey Bay re-examined black abalone population sizes and densities at four locations in Monterey Bay to assess population recovery over ten years later. Alison Haupt will share the findings.

 

Alison Haupt grew up in Monterey and completed her PhD at Hopkins Marine Station. She worked on a project in Baja California using population genetics to track dispersal of marine invertebrates and inform fisheries management. Afterwards she worked for the West Coast Governors Alliance on Ocean Health helping to advance ocean policy on the West Coast.  She returned to academic science as a researcher at the University of Massachusetts Boston, where she examined kelp forest communities on the West and East coasts, and is currently an Assistant Professor at CSUMB.  

 

3:15 - 4:00 John Pearse, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz, “The Strange and Wonderful Sex Life in the Rocky Intertidal”

 

The rocky intertidal has a mind-blowing diversity of sex—beyond most people’s wildest imaginations. There are animals that form exceedingly strong pair bonds with their partners, creating vigorously defended territories and sharing responsibilities for their offspring. But many others, animals and algae, have multiple partners they don’t know . They don’t go through courtship and messy things like copulation. Some care for their offspring even though they don’t know the fathers. Then there are the ones that change sex during their life, or have both sexes at the same time. And many “reproduce” (grow actually) without any sex—and then have sex as well. Some things don’t bother with sex at all. John Pearse will reveal all these creatures that are easy to see right here on the shores of Monterey Bay.

 

John Pearse was a professor at UCSC for over 25 years teaching courses in invertebrate biology, intertidal biology, and kelp forest ecology. His research focused mainly on nearshore ecology, especially in kelp forests, and on the timing of reproduction of marine animals in the Antarctic, Red Sea, and tropical west Pacific, as well as the coast of California. He was the first to demonstrate that sea stars and sea urchins use photoperiod (seasonal changes in day length) as a cue to synchronize reproduction. He is past president of the Western Society of Naturalists, the International Society for Invertebrate Reproduction and Development, the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology, and the California Academy of Sciences. After retirement he developed a program called LiMPETS for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, which is now coordinated by the Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History. The program takes high school students and other interested people into the intertidal as citizen scientists monitoring long-term changes —and learning about and enjoying the spectacular life on our coast.

 

4:15 - 5:00 Steve Shimek, Executive Director, The Otter Project , “What you Otter Know About Sea Otters and why you Otter Care”

 

This sometimes-interactive presentation will be full of fun facts about sea otters and why they are important to our ocean, our planet, and all of us people too.  Why do some otters carry a rock around?  Why don’t all otters carry a rock around?  Where do they keep their rock when they dive?  Why are otters so fluffy?  Did you know that we have forests because of otters? 

 

Steve Shimek founded The Otter Project in 1998.  It has  helped create shipping lanes that reduce the threat of tanker collisions off our coast; helped create California’s network of Marine Protected Areas; sued the Fish and Wildlife Service leading to the end of the “No-Otter Zone” in southern California; and has fought against offshore oil drilling within the sea otter’s range.  Current projects include better enforcement of the offshore shipping lanes, better regulation of agricultural pollution, and exploring ways to reduce the frequency of toxic algal breakouts that close fisheries and kill ocean wildlife, including otters. 

 

Here are our Whalefest Monterey 2018 Symposium YouTube Links produced by Your Sanctuary TV and AMP Media:

Elan Porter Hopkins Marine Station: What Can Undesirable Fish in Whale Food Tell Us?

https://youtu.be/hffAn9E1ZxE

Paul Michel National Marine Sanctuary 2018 Update

https://youtu.be/UEhNHiixQfg

Greg Cailliet  Moss Landing Marine Lab Below Pacific Tides

https://youtu.be/yNDNpbsGlb8

Peggy Stap Marine Life Studies WET Saving Whales from Life Threatening Entanglements

https://youtu.be/dO-vAsRGtbw

Anne Warner Research Scientist Reducing Marine Plastic Pollution

https://youtu.be/dTzMJOedy3U

Heirs to Our Oceans

https://youtu.be/Dhcx2xQ1ug0

Benyamin Rosental Stanford University

https://youtu.be/PRvV4tIohUM

John Pearse Professor Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz, “The Strange and Wonderful Sex Life in the Rocky Intertidal”

https://youtu.be/i17pTgBeRXU

John Ryan, MBARI & John Joseph, NPS. "The Ocean Soundscape is a Whalefest"

https://youtu.be/oWXj2fiv6yA

Alison Haupt CSUMB “Integrating Marine Research into the Classroom”

https://youtu.be/eFZh3wIgFbs

Steve Shimek The Otter Project “You Otter Like this Video”

https://youtu.be/F-ARfQFufTY